Video 20 Sep 66 notes

dungeonsdonuts:

Some of the first few pages of my little instruction booklet primer to my campaign setting. Still a work in progress.

Photo 20 Sep 62 notes meanwhilebackinthedungeon:

— Stephan Poag

meanwhilebackinthedungeon:

— Stephan Poag

Photo 20 Sep 9,122 notes engage-with-zorp:

what’s up with these pancakes

engage-with-zorp:

what’s up with these pancakes

(Source: awwww-cute)

Photo 20 Sep 411 notes

(Source: roka30)

Video 20 Sep 1,161 notes

hyborianbabe:

Illustrations for The Hobbit, by David Wyatt
Video 18 Sep 471 notes

askmiddlearth:

Racism and Middle Earth: Part 3/6: Tolkien and the Men of Darkness

Okay, this is part of an ongoing series, and also a draft (the final, complete version will be offered as a downloadable pdf.) As such there are a couple un-attached pages that you will probably want to know about:

This is the segment I was the most intimidated by, and hesitant to write, so I’ll be especially grateful for any feedback (as mentioned, this is a draft, so any feedback could be used during revision, before I offer the completed series as a download.) But, of course, keep in mind that this is part 3 of 6, so if you feel I’ve left something out, there’s a chance I’ve already talked about it in a previous part (links above.)

Photo 18 Sep 578 notes wesschneider:

1ll-society:

Bromselected by 1ll-society

So funny story about this picture—and by funny I, of course, mean totally uncomfortable.

This is the cover to Dungeon Magazine #70.
Before Paizo started making the Pathfinder RPG, we published Dragon, Dungeon, and a number of other magazines. Something you get with magazines that have letter columns is reader mail. Typically such letters took the form of compliments, complaints, and suggestions. Occasionally, though, we’d get something stranger. We had a file for those letters (some might call them evidence). A file that dated back quite some time. In it was a letter about Dungeon #70.
As far as things could—and did—go, #70’s letter was on the tamer side. It started with the usual thanks and attaboys, buttering us up. Eventually, though, got around to the meet of the matter. It was a love letter. The writer was so taken with the cover of #70 that he had to know more about the woman depicted. Not the character, the actual, real-life woman. After assurances of his noble intentions, he asked that the magazine’s stewards reply with her phone number, address, and/or any other method he might use to get in touch with her. You know… like you do.*
Here’s the trick, though. This is an illustration. While it is possible Brom used a model for this piece, such isn’t a particularly common practice. Additionally, the writer didn’t seem to understand that this was an entirely fictional person, going into rather explicit detail about the feelings evoked by the character’s gothic beauty… and knives.
Now, I get it, dude could have mistook the artwork for a photo, Brom’s @#$%in’ amazing. But being the intermediary recipient between one who’s fallen desperately, letter-writingly in love with a piece of art (and wants her personal info) and said fictional character… well, that won the letter a place in the file.
(* LIKE NO ONE DOES!!!)

wesschneider:

1ll-society:

Brom
selected by 1ll-society

So funny story about this picture—and by funny I, of course, mean totally uncomfortable.

This is the cover to Dungeon Magazine #70.

Before Paizo started making the Pathfinder RPG, we published Dragon, Dungeon, and a number of other magazines. Something you get with magazines that have letter columns is reader mail. Typically such letters took the form of compliments, complaints, and suggestions. Occasionally, though, we’d get something stranger. We had a file for those letters (some might call them evidence). A file that dated back quite some time. In it was a letter about Dungeon #70.

As far as things could—and did—go, #70’s letter was on the tamer side. It started with the usual thanks and attaboys, buttering us up. Eventually, though, got around to the meet of the matter. It was a love letter. The writer was so taken with the cover of #70 that he had to know more about the woman depicted. Not the character, the actual, real-life woman. After assurances of his noble intentions, he asked that the magazine’s stewards reply with her phone number, address, and/or any other method he might use to get in touch with her. You know… like you do.*

Here’s the trick, though. This is an illustration. While it is possible Brom used a model for this piece, such isn’t a particularly common practice. Additionally, the writer didn’t seem to understand that this was an entirely fictional person, going into rather explicit detail about the feelings evoked by the character’s gothic beauty… and knives.

Now, I get it, dude could have mistook the artwork for a photo, Brom’s @#$%in’ amazing. But being the intermediary recipient between one who’s fallen desperately, letter-writingly in love with a piece of art (and wants her personal info) and said fictional character… well, that won the letter a place in the file.

(* LIKE NO ONE DOES!!!)

(Source: 1staab.com)

Video 18 Sep 333,565 notes

kanrose:

pleatedjeans:

Things Are a Little Different in Australia (21 Pics)

i’m australian and i’m not even sure australia is a real place anymore

Photo 18 Sep 612,804 notes thelakerz:

flyawaylikethewind:

new-creatures:

kidswithhats:

afterlifetimes:

thegunstheysell:

motherfuckin-pajamas:

deadkennedysandattractivemen:

A punk stops during a gay pride parade to allow a mesmerized child to touch his jacket spikes.

I lost control about reblogging this picture. 

and this is the perfect “fuck you” to people who stereotype people like this.

You guys. I think I was there for this. I think I saw this picture taken. This is really exciting.

this is the cutest thing ever, omg uwu

Oh so adorable, look at the smile on his face.

Forever reblog

I hope this becomes a classic picture

thelakerz:

flyawaylikethewind:

new-creatures:

kidswithhats:

afterlifetimes:

thegunstheysell:

motherfuckin-pajamas:

deadkennedysandattractivemen:

A punk stops during a gay pride parade to allow a mesmerized child to touch his jacket spikes.

I lost control about reblogging this picture. 

and this is the perfect “fuck you” to people who stereotype people like this.

You guys. I think I was there for this. I think I saw this picture taken. This is really exciting.

this is the cutest thing ever, omg uwu

Oh so adorable, look at the smile on his face.

Forever reblog

I hope this becomes a classic picture

(Source: )

Photo 18 Sep 578 notes wesschneider:

1ll-society:

Bromselected by 1ll-society

So funny story about this picture—and by funny I, of course, mean totally uncomfortable.

This is the cover to Dungeon Magazine #70.
Before Paizo started making the Pathfinder RPG, we published Dragon, Dungeon, and a number of other magazines. Something you get with magazines that have letter columns is reader mail. Typically such letters took the form of compliments, complaints, and suggestions. Occasionally, though, we’d get something stranger. We had a file for those letters (some might call them evidence). A file that dated back quite some time. In it was a letter about Dungeon #70.
As far as things could—and did—go, #70’s letter was on the tamer side. It started with the usual thanks and attaboys, buttering us up. Eventually, though, got around to the meet of the matter. It was a love letter. The writer was so taken with the cover of #70 that he had to know more about the woman depicted. Not the character, the actual, real-life woman. After assurances of his noble intentions, he asked that the magazine’s stewards reply with her phone number, address, and/or any other method he might use to get in touch with her. You know… like you do.*
Here’s the trick, though. This is an illustration. While it is possible Brom used a model for this piece, such isn’t a particularly common practice. Additionally, the writer didn’t seem to understand that this was an entirely fictional person, going into rather explicit detail about the feelings evoked by the character’s gothic beauty… and knives.
Now, I get it, dude could have mistook the artwork for a photo, Brom’s @#$%in’ amazing. But being the intermediary recipient between one who’s fallen desperately, letter-writingly in love with a piece of art (and wants her personal info) and said fictional character… well, that won the letter a place in the file.
(* LIKE NO ONE DOES!!!)

wesschneider:

1ll-society:

Brom
selected by 1ll-society

So funny story about this picture—and by funny I, of course, mean totally uncomfortable.

This is the cover to Dungeon Magazine #70.

Before Paizo started making the Pathfinder RPG, we published Dragon, Dungeon, and a number of other magazines. Something you get with magazines that have letter columns is reader mail. Typically such letters took the form of compliments, complaints, and suggestions. Occasionally, though, we’d get something stranger. We had a file for those letters (some might call them evidence). A file that dated back quite some time. In it was a letter about Dungeon #70.

As far as things could—and did—go, #70’s letter was on the tamer side. It started with the usual thanks and attaboys, buttering us up. Eventually, though, got around to the meet of the matter. It was a love letter. The writer was so taken with the cover of #70 that he had to know more about the woman depicted. Not the character, the actual, real-life woman. After assurances of his noble intentions, he asked that the magazine’s stewards reply with her phone number, address, and/or any other method he might use to get in touch with her. You know… like you do.*

Here’s the trick, though. This is an illustration. While it is possible Brom used a model for this piece, such isn’t a particularly common practice. Additionally, the writer didn’t seem to understand that this was an entirely fictional person, going into rather explicit detail about the feelings evoked by the character’s gothic beauty… and knives.

Now, I get it, dude could have mistook the artwork for a photo, Brom’s @#$%in’ amazing. But being the intermediary recipient between one who’s fallen desperately, letter-writingly in love with a piece of art (and wants her personal info) and said fictional character… well, that won the letter a place in the file.

(* LIKE NO ONE DOES!!!)

(Source: 1staab.com)


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